Starters

  • shellfish on barbeque

    Jamie Olivers seafood barbeque of smoked shellfish.

  • battered black pudding

    I was looking through my old recipes and found this one from Gary Rhodes for black pudding fritters in beer batter. Small black puddings are available widely but I like the catering size (1.36kg) black pudding available from Costco. I cut it into 25mm slices and freeze them defrosting a few at a time as I need them. Black Pudding Fritters in Beer Batter Tasty black pudding slices deep fried in a beer batter 225 g Black pudding (sliced)Oil (for deep frying)For the Batter:300 ml BeerSaltPlain flour (for dusting) Pre-heat the oil to 180°C/350°FThe first thing to do is prepare the black pudding. This can be cut into 12 х 2.5 cm (1 in) pieces – these are really the perfect size for snacks – or split the pudding through the middle, then cut in half to give you quarters. These are a good size for a starter or part of a main course.The next stage is to make the batter. Sift the self-raising flour into a bowl and whisk in the beer, making sure you are left with a good thick consistency. This will increase the lightness of the finished dish.Lightly dust the black pudding with the flour and then dip in the batter. This is best done with a cocktail stick, completely covering the pudding itself while preventing your hands from becoming covered.Providing that the oil has been heated to 180°C/350°F, the cooking time will be between 3-5 minutes until crispy and golden brown. Remove from the fryer, shaking off any excess fat. Lightly sprinkle with salt and serve, perhaps with the sauce of your choice, or why not be really traditional – and eat them with chips out of newspaper! Main CourseBritish Credits: Gary Rhodes

  • Conger eels can grow up to 12 feet in length and weigh upwards of 300 pounds. Big eels like this, however, would not be suitable for eating as the flesh would be far too tough. If taking a conger eel for the pot when fishing, you would only want to consider a smaller eel (sometimes called strap conger eel), ensuring they are more than 36 inches (91cm) in length to comply with current minimum catch size regulations. courtesy of Gordon Hamilton – delishably.com Freshwater or silver eels when poached produce a liquor which when reduced sets to a jelly. Conger eels seem to produce less of the setting agent when cooked so this is supplemented in the recipe with gelatin. Jellied Conger Eel A traditional East End of London dish adapted for conger eel. 4 Conger eel steaksFor blanching1 tbsp Sea saltFor cooking1 stick Celery (chopped)1 Carrot (chopped)½ Onion (chopped)½ Lime4 tbsp Malt Vinegar½ tsp Sea salt½ tsp Freshly ground black pepper750 ml WaterFor the jelly2 leaves Gelatine Bring a pan of salted water to the boil, reduce to a simmer and very gently blanch the eel steaks for a couple of minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. Discard the water.In a large pan of salted water, add the eel steaks and the rest of the ingredients. Bring to a gentle boil, reduce the heat and gently simmer for 20 minutes.Remove the eel steaks with a slotted spoon, set aside and allow to cool. Strain the cooking licquor into a separate pan and also allow to cool.While the licquor is still warm prepare the gelatine leaves using the pack instructions and dissolve in the licquor, warming if necessary. Allow to cool but not to set.Place the eel steaks into a serving bowl and pour over the licquor. Place in the fridge to set. To make individual portions remove the eel meat from the central bone and place the chunks in to a disposable cup before filling with the licquor and allowing to set. Snack, StarterBritish Credits: delishably.com

  • moule mariniere

    Check out this easy recipe for Moules marinière (sailors mussels). This classic French recipe is a great way to impress the family in no time at all – ready on the table in 30 minutes.

  • Pimientos de Padron

    Pimientos de Padrón are small, bright green peppers that come from the municipality of Padrón in Galicia, in the northwest part of Spain.