Bacon and Onion Roly-Poly Pudding
bacon and onion roly poly

Bacon and Onion Roly-Poly Pudding

Total time: 2 hours 45 minutes
Servings: 4
bacon and onion roly poly

Last Updated on 09/07/2022 by richard

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Celebrating British Food & Cooking

Bacon and onion roly-poly pudding is a classic British family favourite from the 1960s.

I have very fond memories of my grandmother’s cooking. She was a very traditional cook and my childhood dinners were good old British standards like shepherds or cottage pies and suet puddings like this one or steak and kidney.

I think that her choices were influenced by wartime rationing which only stopped in the UK in 1955. The need to provide filling, substantial meals with limited ingredients means using what is available.

Children who cleared their plates would get dessert (aka pudding), confusing I know! Granny’s apple crumbles with lashings of hot custard were legendary.

Anyhow, let’s get back to the roly-poly pudding!

This bacon and onion suet pudding is made with suet pastry, bacon and onions and then rolled up like a Swiss roll (think suet dumpling with a bacon and onion filling) and steamed for about 2 and a half hours.

laid out bacon and onion roly poly
Laid out pudding before rolling up ©recipesfromacornishkitchen

Really easy to make and only simply seasoned, give it a try.

I seem to remember my Granny making it using leftover boiled bacon. The meat was definitely in chunks rather than thin strips. The next time we have boiled bacon, mash and cabbage (my wife’s Irish so it’s only a matter of time), I will try it and let you know.

irish bacon mash andcabbage
Irish bacon mash and cabbage

This is a real tummy filler. Serve it up sliced with new potatoes, peas and gravy for a nostalgic treat!

bacon and onion pudding served with new potatoes and peas

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Here’s the Recipe …

bacon and onion roly poly

Bacon and Onion Roly Poly Pudding

richard
The classic 1960's suet and bacon pudding like Granny used to make.
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 2 hrs 30 mins
Total Time 2 hrs 45 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine British
Servings 4
Calories 468 kcal
How Difficult Average

Equipment

Ingredients
 
 

  • 220 g Self-raising flour
  • 120 g Beef suet Atora
  • 180 ml Water
  • Salt a couple of pinches
  • 6 rashers Back bacon smoked, trimmed of fat
  • 1 onion medium
  • White pepper

Instructions
 

  • Slice the onion thinly and cut the bacon into bite size pieces.
  • Put the flour, suet and salt into a large mixing bowl and mix together. Add the water and stir to mix well.
  • On a floured worktop, roll the pastry into an oblong to about 1 cm thickness.
  • Put the bacon and onion over the pastry and sprinkle with a little white pepper and roll up like a Swiss roll.
  • Now flour a clean muslin cloth and put the pudding on the cloth and roll it up like a Swiss roll.
  • Tie both ends with string and place it into a steamer basket.
  • Cover and steam for 2 and a half hours taking care that the water doesn’t boil dry.
  • Slice the pudding and serve with potatoes, peas and gravy.

YOUR OWN NOTES

Nutrition

Calories: 468kcalCarbohydrates: 42gProtein: 8gFat: 29gSaturated Fat: 16gFiber: 2gSugar: 1g
Keyword bacon, British, pudding, steamed, suet
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Frequently Asked Questions

What is beef suet?

Beef suet is the hard crumbly fat from around a cow’s kidneys.

A suet pastry is a dough that combines suet and flour with a bit of milk or water. It can be made sweet or savoury by adding sugar or salt.

Suet can be found in the baking aisle. Modern suet is treated and dusted with a bit of flour to keep the shreds from sticking together.

My bacon and onion pudding has 468 calories per serving.

Atora is a British brand of suet.

No. Suet is the hard fat from around cows’ and sheep’s kidneys whereas lard is a soft fat from pigs.

Suet is fat, so other fats like lard or butter can be used. The main benefit of using suet is its higher melting and burning temperature.

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